IKEA Still Selling Dangerous Dressers

In 2016 IKEA recalled millions of dressers because they could tip over and crush young children.  Eight children have been killed by ILEA dressers falling on them.  Consumer Reports issued a critical report stating that IKEA is not doing enough to correct the problem and the dressers are a serious safety risk for young children.

Ikea Still Sells a Hemnes Dresser Linked to a Child’s Death. The company has not recalled the 8-drawer dresser. Why not?

In November, 2017 the Consumer Product Safety Commission made the announcement after eight children died and there were reports of 144 children injured to consumers that they should stop using all IKEA children’s chests and dressers taller than 23 ½ inches.  If consumers chose repair over refund, the furniture should be securely anchored to the wall.

What You Can Do

Consumer Reports says if you have a Hemnes eight-drawer dresser, make sure you anchor it (and any other dresser in your home) securely to the wall. If you don’t have the anchors that came with your dresser, you can purchase anti-tip restraints online and at many hardware and big-box stores. Or place the dresser in a room that children can’t access.

Worth Repeating

Every day, we represent victims of personal injury and wrongful death as they seek justice, and lawsuits we have pursued have resulted in safety changes. Sadly, many of those changes came after someone was injured. In 2015 we warned about these dangerous chests and dressers. Because we continue to believe it is vital to try to help prevent injuries and deaths, we will continue publish recalls information about defective and dangerous products.

Furniture Tip-Over Deaths – Help Keep Your Family Safe

Consumer Federation calls out IKEA for dangerous dressers

Dressers Exempt From Industry Safety Standard Fail Consumer Reports’ Tests

About The Author

Wayne Hogan

Wayne Hogan

Wayne Hogan, a Jacksonville native, has been with the firm since 1977. He graduated from Florida State University, where he received both his bachelor’s and J.D. degrees. He specializes in all areas of personal injury law. In addition to participating in many professional associations, he and his wife, Pat, are also actively involved in the community.