Opioid Drug Maker Settles for $270 Million

Purdue Pharma, the maker of Oxycontin, and the Sackler family, founder and owner of Purdue Pharma, have agreed to settle a lawsuit brought by the Oklahoma attorney general for $270 million. OxyContin is an opioid painkiller that was falsely marketed as safe and less addictive. States across the nation are fighting an opioid epidemic that has killed hundreds of thousands and addicted even more. Thirty six states have brought suits.

The Oklahoma suit was filed against some of the nation’s leading producers of opioid pain medications and distributors. It alleges that the drug makers’ deceptive marketing over the past ten years has fueled the epidemic in Oklahoma. Defendants include Purdue Pharma, Johnson & Johnson, Teva Pharmaceuticals, Allergan and several others. The companies misled consumers into thinking that opioids are safe for long-term use.

Opioid Litigation

Opioid marketing by pharmaceutical companies having negligently fueled the national opioid epidemic is alleged in the more than 1,500 civil lawsuits around the country. U.S. District Judge Dan Polster, who is overseeing hundreds of the cases, has already scheduled the first trials. Terrell • Hogan is involved in this litigation. Opioids we have investigated for these claims include: Oxycodone and OxyContin.

If you or a loved one in Florida became addicted to or damaged by prescribed opioids or died from an opioid overdose, consider contacting attorney Leslie A. Goller at (904) 722-2228 for a free consultation.

Purdue Pharma to pay $270 million to settle historic Oklahoma opioid lawsuit

Opioid Marketing Linked to Opioid Deaths 

About The Author

Leslie A. Goller

Leslie A. Goller

Leslie has dedicated her career to championing consumers – whether they were harmed by big corporations, dangerous products, medical mistakes, accidents, or an unsafe environment – no issue is too big for her to tackle. She successfully prevented an incinerator from being built at University Hospital (now UF-Jacksonville), which would have polluted the air with toxic chemicals and obtained significant restrictions of other Jacksonville hospital incinerators resulting in cleaner air.